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  HOME | Venezuela (Click here for more Venezuela news)

Venezuela's Chávez Introduces Allende’s Grandson as His Daughter’s New Beau

CARACAS – Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez over the weekend presented Dr. Pablo Sepúlveda Allende, youngest grandson of the late Chilean President Salvador Allende, as the “friend” of his second daughter, journalist María Chávez.

During a tour on his weekly show Sunday of a state-run center for producing pharmaceuticals in Caracas, Chávez spied the physician among several professionals and briefly took him in front of the cameras.

“Pablo!” the Venezuelan president shouted, hugged him and explained that this was “a Chilean doctor, a friend of María and grandson of Salvador Allende,” for whom he regularly expresses his admiration and calls “the martyr president.”

The Venezuelan press said in recent days that the journalist, the president’s second daughter from his first marriage, had managed to convince Sepúlveda Allenda, who was born in Mexico and graduated in medicine in Cuba, that he leave the medical center where he was working in the Chilean city of Coquimbo, inaugurated by his grandfather who was also a doctor, and come live in Venezuela.

The 29-year-old María Chávez, who in some ceremonies appears as a virtual first lady after her father’s second divorce, achieved fame as the first to report that Chávez was “a prisoner president” when he was briefly ousted from power in April 2002, and denied that he had resigned.

Another supposed tie between Chávez and Chile was reported last Friday when Manuel Contreras, ex-head of Chile’s secret police during the 1973-1990 military dictatorship that brought Allende down, said that on one occasion he helped Chávez.

“I once helped the current Venezuelan president,” Contreras told the online edition of Chile’s Cambio 21 newspaper from the jail where he is confined for crimes he committed at the head of the defunct DINA secret police, but declined to give further details. EFE
 

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