|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Japan Passes Law Supporting Its Controversial Commercial Whaling

TOKYO – Japan has passed a law to financially support “sustainable” commercial whaling and promote the consumption of whale meat, a controversial practice that the country resumed in July after a 32-year moratorium.

The revised law won the support of the Diet (Japanese parliament) on Thursday, although there has not been an official announcement by the government, public broadcaster NHK reported on Friday.

Under this law, the government will support the country’s whaling industry in securing ships and crew, besides promoting the consumption of whale meat in schools, the broadcaster added.

It also urges the industry to respect the quotas set by Japanese scientists to ensure “sustainable” whaling and includes measures against illegal trade of whale meat.

This law comes after Japan decided to resume commercial whaling in July, which eventually led to the country’s withdrawal from the International Whaling Commission – of which it had been a member since April 21, 1951 – that prohibits the capture of cetaceans.

Japan’s whale-hunting activities have led to condemnation from the international community and an International Court of Justice ruling against Tokyo, which defends the activity as being a part of its tradition and citing its economic importance, despite the currently modest demand in the country for whale meat.

In the Asian country, whaling provides direct employment for around 300 people, without including the processing and packaging industries for whale meat, according to data provided by the government.

The annual consumption of whale meat in Japan has hovered around 5,000 tons in recent years, a demand which is largely filled by imports, and is a far cry from the peak demand of 230,000 tons per year reached in the 1960s, when it was commonly consumed all over the country, including school lunches.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved