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  HOME | World (Click here for more)

NATO Rules Out New Missiles in Europe, Says It Does Not Want Arms Race

BRUSSELS – The North Atlantic Treaty Organization has no intention of deploying new ground-based nuclear missiles in Europe in the event that a Soviet-era treaty aimed at eliminating short- and medium-range missiles is abandoned, the head of the Alliance said on Tuesday.

Jens Stoltenberg told reporters in Brussels ahead of a meeting with NATO defense ministers that Russia’s “violation” of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF Treaty) would be one of the topics on the agenda.

“We do not intend to deploy new ground-based nuclear missiles in Europe,” Stoltenberg said. “At the same time, we remain committed to meaningful arms control and non-proliferation efforts.”

“NATO does not want a new arms race, because that would be in nobody’s interest,” added Stoltenberg.

The NATO chief said the United States and other allies had called on Moscow to abide by the treaty “over many years,” and that was why the US recently announced its intention to abandon the treaty within six months.

“We all know that a treaty that is only respected by one side cannot keep us safe,” said the politician.

He urged Russia to “take the responsible path” and “return to compliance and save the INF Treaty,” something that was being offered as a “last opportunity.”

The Norwegian politician acknowledged, however, that NATO allies were “planning for a world without the INF Treaty.”

NATO defense ministers were to meet in the Belgian capital on Wednesday and Thursday.

Stoltenberg said other topics on the agenda would be NATO missions in Afghanistan, Iraq and Kosovo.

Ministers would also attend a session on NATO-European Union cooperation and EU defense efforts, the head of the Alliance said.

“Of course, EU efforts on defense cannot replace NATO,” he said, adding that any EU efforts must complement and not compete with existing ones.

The chief ended his speech by welcoming the defense minister of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Radmila Sekerinska, whose country joined a NATO meeting for the first time after member states last week signed an accession protocol for the eastern European nation.

The INF Treaty was signed on Dec. 8, 1987 between the US and Soviet Union, an agreement aimed to eliminate short-range missiles (covering a range of up to 1,000 kilometers; 620 miles) and intermediate ones (up to 5,500 km; 3,420 miles).

 

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