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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Spanish Artist Displays “Happy Endings” of Brutal Stories in Bangkok

BANGKOK – A taxi driver smiling with a bloodied face after an accident, an exuberant tourist taking a selfie with a starving child in a warring country – these and more “Happy Endings” to stories of suffering illustrated by a Spanish artist were on display at a Bangkok gallery on Friday.

Joan Cornella’s hundreds of canvasses imitating vignettes were put on show at the Woof Pack gallery from Thursday and will be on display until Dec. 3.

In his “Happy Endings” art work, a reflection of modern society, the 38-year-old illustrator has used phrases like as “your life is miserable” or “we all die alone” on the vignettes that show men and women smiling despite their agonies.

One of his works shows a rubicund boy hitchhiking to extinction. There is a psychologist giving his patient a note which reads “kill yourself.”

A visitor from the United States told EFE that Cornella’s illustrations touch on controversial topics such as pedophilia, death, aggression, sex change and poverty with a dark humor that hopes to bring smiles to visitors’ faces.

Cornella, who had visited Bangkok with his works in 2017, was inspired by Thai culture which can be seen in a dozen of his creations.

The Catalan illustrator’s exhibition coincides with Bangkok Art Biennale – which runs until February – and sees installations and exhibitions across several locations in the Thai capital.

 

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