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  HOME | Mexico

City Hall Says Water Service to Resume in Mexican Capital

MEXICO CITY – Residents of the Mexican capital will again have water flowing from their taps by late Tuesday after a days-long shutdown, the municipal government said.

The pumping of water will begin to fill cisterns and tanks in part of Mexico City on Wednesday, although service will not be 100 percent restored before the weekend, water system director Ramon Aguirre told Radio Formula.

“I am absolutely certain that today we will be given water,” Aguirre said.

Some 22 million people in greater Mexico City were without running water from Oct. 31-Nov. 3 due to a suspension of service to install a new pipe.

Although service was restored on Sunday, it was halted once again shortly afterwards due to a technical failure related to the installation of a so-called “K inverted” part, which is responsible for distributing water from the existing line to a newly installed one.

Media outlets criticized the Comision Nacional del Agua (Conagua) for mismanaging the project.

In response, Conagua spokesman Jose Luis Alcudia said that the work “achieved its fundamental objective,” which was to provide “redundancy” and security to the system.

With the second line installed, it will be possible to “provide maintenance to the system without having to stop it altogether,” he added.

The overexploitation of the aquifers in the Valley of Mexico forced the construction in the 1980s of a system to carry water hundreds of kilometers to the capital from the Cutzmala River.

 

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