|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Peru

Archaeologists Find Tombs of 24 Inca Nobles in Valley of the Pyramids

TUCUME, Peru – A set of as many as 24 royal tombs was discovered in Peru’s majestic Valley of the Pyramids, shining a new light on the largest empire in the pre-Columbian Americas.

The finding – which was presented on Wednesday by a group of archaeologists with the country’s Ministry of Culture – confirms the value that the Incas placed on the Tucume pyramids, which are part of Peru’s largest architectural complex of its kind.

“We have evidence that this is an elite group, comprised by both men and women,” Bernarda Delgado, director of the Tucume museum, told EFE, adding that the individuals were buried wrapped in fine garments and next to an assortment of ceramic utensils, which were not familiar to the common folk.

The collection of 26 pyramids – among which is the tallest in all of South America – may seem to the untrained eye as nothing more than a few sandy hills spread throughout the 221-hectare (540-acre) surface.

However, underneath the mounds hide several pyramids built some thousand years ago – centuries before the Incas arrived in the land around 1470 – using mud bricks instead of stones.

Both the Incas and the mysterious culture behind the edifices gave the complex a ceremonial role, which is evinced by the Inca tombs discovered by Executing Unit 005 Naylamp in the Las Abejas temple, one of the structures that comprise the compound.

With 89 people working on site and a government grant of 8.3 million soles (about $2.5 million), the archaeologists hope to find more Inca burials in the site.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved