|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Manatee Deaths Spur Mexico to Action

MEXICO CITY – After the recent death of eight manatees in the southern state of Tabasco, Mexico’s Profepa environmental protection agency announced on Thursday that it is taking action to strengthen conservation measures.

Profepa said in a statement that it had carried out “monitoring rounds, water-quality sampling, as well as sampling of food sources to discover the possible causes of death of the eight manatees.”

Tissue samples to determine the presence of toxic elements and the cause of death were only taken from one of the dead manatees, as the other seven carcasses were highly decomposed.

Recent water-quality sampling has shown that pollution in the lagoons where the manatees live is not above recommended levels for wildlife.

However, Mexico’s National Water Commission has taken new samples to determine if pesticides or oil has contaminated the water.

Besides the eight dead manatees, a live female manatee showing signs of severe malnutrition was also found.

To address this issue, Tabasco environmental authorities have set up manatee feeding stations on the lagoons’ shores.

Profepa warned that manatee populations in Mexico have drastically diminished in the last few years because of the destruction of their habitat, diseases, and poaching.

The largest population of manatees in Mexico live in Tabasco, where there are an estimated 1,000 specimens left.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved