|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivians Use Stuffed Animals to Draw Attention to Plight of Kids

LA PAZ – The Bolivian chapter of the organization SOS Children’s Villages placed stuffed animals at various spots on Friday as part of its “Me importan” (They Matter to Me) campaign to raise awareness about problems affecting children.

The toys – perched on sidewalks, fountains and benches – were accompanied by messages about issues such as child labor, domestic violence and the lack of education and health services.

“Little Raul cannot hug his father, because they won’t let him visit him,” “Anahi cannot play with me anymore because she has to work to support her family,” “Abigail cries every night because her parents drink alcohol,” were some of the messages.

Each message ends with the question “Do you care?” intended as a call to action.

More than 600 stuffed animals were placed at strategic spots throughout La Paz and neighboring El Alto.

The campaign is making its way through Bolivia’s major cities to motivate officials and the public to assist the nearly 1 million minors in the country whose rights are being violated, SOS Children’s Villages spokeswoman Gladys Villazon told the media.

The goal, she said, is to “give a voice to children” who are suffering.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved