|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

UNICEF: At Least 17 Million Babies Worldwide Breathing Toxic Air

DHAKA – At least 17 million babies worldwide live in areas where air pollution is at least six times higher than accepted healthy limits making them vulnerable to various diseases, a report by the United Nations Children’s Fund warned Wednesday.

According to the report, “Danger in the air,” released in Dhaka, more than three-quarters of babies under the age of one – some 12.2 million – who breathe toxic air that exceed six times the limits set by the World Health Organization, live in South Asia.

“Not only do pollutants harm babies’ developing lungs – they can permanently damage their developing brains – and, thus, their futures,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake.

In East Asia and the Pacific region some 4.3 million babies are exposed to the threat of pollution.

According to the UNICEF report, ultrafine pollution particles can enter the bloodstream and damage the blood-brain barrier causing neuroinflammation among these children.

Some particles can damage key areas for communication between neurons, while others have a magnetic charge that can lead to neurodegenerative diseases.

The report added that many of these children, especially those living in urban slums, are already at risk from various infectious diseases owing to inadequate living conditions, including lack of clean water and sanitation.

The report also urged countries to invest in renewable energy, improve access to public transport, and strengthen the health system to ensure children are immune to the ill effects of pollution.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved