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  HOME | Central America

Congressional Committee Backs Withdrawal of Guatemalan President’s Immunity

GUATEMALA CITY – The congressional committee set up to investigate preliminary charges against Guatemala’s President Jimmy Morales recommended the withdrawal of his immunity late Sunday.

Morales is accused of campaign finance irregularities.

“The recommendation is unanimous that the pre-trial immunity should be withdrawn; the plenary session will decide if it is withdrawn or not,” the head of the committee, Julio Ixcamey, said outside the Congress building.

Ixcamey, who is a deputy of the opposition party National Unity of Hope, said on Sunday that the report will be presented to congress by Monday.

The withdrawal of the president’s immunity was requested by the public prosecutor’s office and the UN-backed International Commission Against Impunity.

The details of the report have not been shared and it was not known if criminal proceedings have also been recommended along with the withdrawal of immunity.

Morales allegedly committed the election financing fraud when he was the secretary-general of the National Convergence Front in 2015.

According to preliminary investigations, the party had hidden information about at least 6.7 million quetzals ($919,000) received in campaign contributions.

Congress sources said that a press conference has been called at 11:00 am on Monday to give more details about the congressional committee’s report.

Congress will have to convene a session to vote on the recommendations of the committee, which needs 105 out of the total 158 votes to be approved.

 

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