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  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivia Asks Argentina to Step Up Installation of Nuclear Medicine Centers

LA PAZ – Bolivian President Evo Morales asked his Argentine counterpart, Mauricio Macri, for an urgent meeting to define the cancer-fighting technology of the three nuclear medicine centers that Argentina is to install in Bolivia.

The president told the media Friday that he spoke with Macri this week about Bolivia’s decision to invest $160 million in the installation of those medical centers in the Andean cities of La Paz and El Alto, and in the eastern city of Santa Cruz.

“Four or five days ago I spoke with President Macri of Argentina to ask for an urgent meeting to agree on a workable transfer and installation of those centers,” he said.

The president added that he has received technical recommendations about the benefits of acquiring Argentina’s cancer-fighting technology.

Negotiations for the Southern Cone country’s collaboration with Bolivia on this project have been going on since last year.

Argentina’s ambassador to Bolivia, Normando Alvarez, told EFE in a previous interview that his country is capable of completing the first nuclear medicine center in 24 months from the signing of the final agreement.

The Bolivian government believes that when the entire infrastructure is working, Bolivians won’t have to seek cancer treatment in Chile, Brazil, the United States or Europe, as is currently the case.

For several months, associations of families of cancer victims in La Paz have organized protests to raise awareness about their plight and to demand that the Morales government do something about it.

Bolivia will also build a nuclear medicine research center in El Alto for $300 million to serve the three nuclear medicine centers.

Infrastructure of the research center will be built by Russia’s Rosatom company and will be the largest in South America, the La Paz government said.

 

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