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  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Spanish Left-Wing Party Presents Vote of No Confidence against Government

MADRID – A Spanish left-wing opposition party on Friday proposed its leader as a candidate to lead the country’s government and lodged a vote of no confidence against the current center-right government.

The spokeswoman for Unidos Podemos, the third largest party in Spain, said the move expressed hope in the face of the social emergency provoked by corruption and pillaging at the hands of the ruling Popular Party.

Government spokesman Iñigo Mendez de Vigo said there were no objective reasons for a vote.

According to Spanish legislation, a vote of no confidence against the government can be held if it is back by 10 percent of lawmakers, or 35 of the 350 who make up Parliament.

It must also include the name of a candidate – in this case Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias – who, should the vote go through, would become the new prime minister.

In order for the vote to go through, an absolute majority must then vote against the government.

At the moment, Podemos has 67 lawmakers, meaning it has enough votes to request a vote of no confidence, but requires support from other parties in order to replace the current government.

The director of the leftist Socialist Party (PSOE), the second largest party in Spain, said the vote was a poisoned chalice that Podemos was offering in order to interfere in the upcoming PSOE internal elections for a new party leader.

Albert Rivera, leader of the centrist Ciudadanos party, said Iglesias was declaring himself a savior with a fictional vote of no confidence.

The parliamentary spokesman for PP, Rafael Hernando, said the vote was another fuss made to compete for the left’s confused vote.

 

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