|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Japan’s Abe Sends Offering to Controversial Yasukuni Shrine Again

TOKYO – Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe sent on Friday an offering to Tokyo’s controversial Yasukuni Shrine again, a practice that usually generates friction with neighboring countries as the shrine is seen as a connection to Japan’s militarist past.

Abe sent a small tree as a ritual offering on the occasion of the shrine’s annual spring festival, local media reported.

Although he is not expected to visit the shrine in person, it is likely that countries such as South Korea and China, which suffered under Japanese colonial rule until the middle of the 20th century, will again protest against the offering, as on previous occasions.

A group of Japanese parliamentarians, including some cabinet ministers, are also expected to visit the shrine between Friday and Sunday, when the spring festival ends.

The Abe administration is expected to avoid gestures that could infuriate China, as Tokyo seeks better ties with Beijing amid rising tension in the region due to North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs.

The Yasukuni Shrine honors those who died for Japan between the late 19th century until 1945, including 14 politicians and Imperial Army officers convicted as war criminals by the International Military Tribunal at the end of World War II.

Between the beginning of the 20th century and the end of this war, Japan colonized the Korean peninsula, Manchuria and other regions of China, and occupied much of Southeast Asia.

Abe last visited the Yasukuni Shrine as the head of the government in December 2013, which triggered strong protests from China and South Korea, while Washington, Tokyo’s main strategic ally, suggested that the prime minister should not repeat such visits.

Since then, Abe has avoided visiting the shrine personally, although he has sent offerings for the shrine’s autumn and spring festivals, in what is considered a nod to his more conservative followers.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved