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  HOME | Venezuela (Click here for more Venezuela news)

TalCual: Why No One Investigates the Bribes at Odebrecht in Venezuela?
According to information from New York, where the case is also being investigated since the money passed through the American financial system, some people with influence in the Maduro government received about $98 million

By TalCual

Venezuela has become the second country with more murders in Latin America, but regarding the bribes paid by Brazilian conglomerate Odebrecht is the champion.

In both respects, the government of Nicolás Maduro and the rest of the public "authorities" serving him remain tight-lipped. They don’t say a word about the country’s murder rate or the bribes paid by the Brazilian company for all the favors received.

In both respects, the government of Nicolás Maduro and the rest of the public "authorities" serving him remain tight-lipped. They don’t say a word about the country’s murder rate or the bribes paid by the Brazilian company for all the favors received.

According to information from New York, where the case is also being investigated since the money passed through the American financial system, some people with influence in the Maduro government received about $98 million.

This is not the first corruption scandal exposing the leaders of chavismo and, most likely, won’t be the last. What happened with the so-called Plan Bolívar 2000 launched in 1999 by the late President Hugo Chávez seems far away. Since then, other bribery episodes have taken place and, in the vast majority of them, those in charge of investigating and punishing corruption have totally washed their hands.

Let us remember that one of the justifications for the unjustifiable coup on February 4 1992 was, according to the own coup perpetrators, the rampant corruption that existed in the country back then.

It is true that there was corruption at that time but, compared to these past 18 years, rulers from democratic parties such as Acción Democrática and Copei were a bunch of toddlers. There are examples of representatives of the "Bolivarian revolution" living comfortably in the U.S. with properties and assets impossible to acquire with the salary of an army officer or national treasurer.

Others who were ministers suddenly decided to move to Germany with an unknown public office or diplomatic post as if living in that European nation was cheap. This raises the following question: is the salary of a minister in Venezuela so productive? The cases of Diego Salazar, cousin of former oil minister and PDVSA president Rafael Ramírez, Nervis Villalbos, former Vice Minister of Energy, and Carlos Aguilera, all investigated for receiving deposits in European accounts, were disregarded by the Maduro government.

Cases keep increasing and multiplying as leaders of chavismo turn a blind eye to them. When they were an absolute majority in the Parliament (aka National Assembly or AN), they voted against all corruption investigations requested by the opposition.

Some of those lawmakers from the ruling party in the AN today talk about fighting corruption in general, but they are paralyzed by fear when the time comes to move from words to action.

It turns out that the once impeccable anti-corruption flag of the "heroes" of the February 4 1992 coup today has stains and patches all over.

Now then, what about Luisa Ortega Díaz, the Attorney General of the Republic? She remained silent with most of the corruption cases, and it seems that she will maintain the same behavior with the Odebrecht case.

In Brazil, a judge decided to investigate an irregularity and gave rise to the so-called operation Lava Jato (Operation Car Wash) that triggered a political earthquake in that country. In this case, until the last presidential campaign of Hugo Chávez, he seems to have received money from Odebrecht.

In Venezuela, the complicit silence of some allows the corrupt to enjoy what they have stolen while most people in the country suffer the consequences. Let us hope that the AN does its job and points the finger at the real culprits of the Odebrecht bribery case. So much impunity must be stopped once and for all.

USA v Odebrecht - USDC EDNY - FCPA Charges - December 2016 by Latin American Herald Tribune on Scribd


 

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