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  HOME | World (Click here for more)

China Replaces Top Official for Tibet

BEIJING – The Communist Party of China, or CPC, announced over the weekend the appointment of Wu Yingjie as the party’s new secretary general in the Tibet Autonomous Region, a sensitive post owing to frequent tensions between the native population and the Han Chinese.

Wu will replace Chen Quanguo, who will also step down from his post in the CPC Central Committee in the region due to unknown reasons.

Wu has built almost his entire political career working in the Tibetan region, where he was deputy governor and propaganda chief.

Like his predecessor, Wu also belongs to the majority Han Chinese ethnic group, following a tradition as per which autonomous regions of ethnic minorities, including Tibet, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, have governors belonging to that ethnic group while the secretary general, the most powerful official, is from the Han ethnic group.

In addition, the CPC also announced on Sunday a change in the secretary generals of the provinces of Hunan and Yunan in southern China.

These posts will now be occupied by two allies of President Xi Jinping, who worked with him when he was party chief in Shanghai.

These changes come a year before the 19th Party Congress, where other important changes are expected to be made in the party’s top leadership.

 

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