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  HOME | Mexico

New Service in Mexico Counsels Those Who Seek Sex-Change

GUADALAJARA, Mexico – A new service was recently founded in western Mexico to provide assistance in the difficult process facing people who decide to have a surgical sex-change and have been rejected by their families because of their transgender condition.

Casa Impulso Trans is the first establishment in Mexico to offer counseling along with medical, psychological and legal aid, its president Izack Zacarias, a young man who decided to leave behind his life as a woman, told EFE.

This is a place where they can come, settle in and “find a solution so they can go on with their lives,” said the activist, a native of Tequila municipality in the western state of Jalisco.

Since its opening a few months ago, the establishment has received some 20 patients from northern and central Mexico.

Those who come to this two-bedroom house outside the city are going through “a complicated emotional process,” not only to accept their deep-down wish for gender change, but also to deal with their families when it comes time to announce their decision, Zacarias said.

“There are no statistics, but of the people I know, at least half have suffered rejection by their families and have had to leave home,” he said.

Edgar Gonzalez Galarza, the psychologist and sexologist who counsels those who come to Casa Impulso Trans, says the staff takes on the task of finding the parents of those who come to the refuge with the intention of reconnecting patients with their families, and in some cases they succeed.

Parental support is fundamental for those who decide to go through with this transition from one sex to another, known as “gender reassignment,” since they will be less likely to get into high-risk situations like drug abuse or prostitution, above all in the case of transgender women, he said.

Aside from psychological companionship, the activists arrange medical attention by specialists who understand the transition process, from the implementing of hormone therapy to the necessary surgeries for modifying the body.

“It’s a long, tedious and costly process,” said Zacarias, who experienced the rejection of doctors that refused to treat him for ethical reasons or tried to convince him to forget the whole idea with “moral and religious arguments.”

Since 2015, the Mexico City Civil Registry has allowed those who have undergone gender reassignment to obtain a birth certificate reflecting their new gender identity.

 

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