|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Boko Haram Landmines Inflict Heavy Toll on Cameroon

YAUNDE – In its war against Nigeria-based Boko Haram, Cameroon must confront a danger that becomes evident only when it is too late: homemade landmines that have already claimed a hundred lives in the northern part of the country.

On Feb. 14, a pick-up truck carrying 12 soldiers from the Cameroonian army’s elite BIR unit was blown up by a Boko Haram landmine near the town of Kerawa.

One soldier was killed and the other 11 remain hospitalized, including one man who lost both legs in the blast.

Ironically, the soldiers were struck while on their way back from a mission to dismantle a Boko Haram bomb factory.

The BIR team destroyed four landmine workshops and seized five completed mines along with hundreds of containers holding explosives, batteries and detonators, a military source told EFE.

Such incidents are common in Cameroon’s far north. Two BIR troops died in October when their vehicle detonated a mine and a similar explosion a few days later left one soldier and six others wounded.

“Damage caused by these homemade mines is becoming ever more frequent,” Cameroonian analyst Guibai Gaitama told EFE. “The terrorists use them to mine roads, houses, vehicles. Everything.”

Though the Multinational Joint Task Force, comprising units from Benin, Cameroon, Chad, Niger, and Nigeria, has disrupted Boko Haram supply lines in the area, the terrorists remain capable of manufacturing the makeshift bombs.

“The terrorists use local products like salt, fertilizer and powder, which they then pack into propane tanks, food cans and even empty shells from large-caliber bullets,” a Cameroonian officer said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved