|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

Protests Paralyze Bus System in Colombian Capital

BOGOTA – Protests by passengers brought the bus system to a standstill on the south side of Bogota, where a large police contingent was deployed to control the disturbance, the second this week in the Colombian capital.

As already happened on Wednesday, dozens of people protested around 6 a.m. – the rush hour – for what they consider the worst possible service.

The demonstration took place at Soacha, on the south side of Bogota, where thousands of people live who work or study in the capital, and who on Friday found themselves going nowhere, with long delays or a complete shutdown of the Transmilenio bus system.

After almost three hours of protests, riot police showed up at the scene, where they activated a water cannon to disperse the protesters, some of whom responded by throwing rocks at the cops.

It was the second protest this week against the Transmilenio system, which recently raised its ticket price from 1,800 to 2,000 pesos (52 cents to 58 cents).

The increase sparked great resentment among low-income riders, particularly those getting by on the minimum wage, equivalent to roughly $201 a month.

Added to that were the usual complaints about delays in the service and the scarcity of buses.

After the protests on Wednesday, Bogota Mayor Enrique Peñalosa said the blockage of Transmilenio was done for political reasons and announced sanctions against people who disturb the peace in this city of almost 8 million inhabitants.

“There are politically organized saboteurs. They’re committing crimes, they’ve damaged buses and are ruining the quality of life of many people. They are the citizens’ enemies,” Peñalosa said.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved