|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Brazilian Mine That Caused Environmental Disaster Has Another Spill

RIO DE JANEIRO – The Samarco mine in the southeastern city of Mariana, where last November a huge toxic waste spill caused Brazil’s worst environmental disaster, has had a new spill although no victims have been reported, the company announced Wednesday.

The new landslide is of smaller proportions than the November incident and involves residues that remained at the site after the earlier spill – with 19 people confirmed dead or still missing – caused irreparable damage to the environment.

At the time of the new accident there were about 150 company workers on site who had to be evacuated, Civil Defense spokesmen said.

Samarco said that recent rains caused the new incident, adding that the avalanche did not include residue from the mining complex and did not reach the rivers in the area.

The firm emphasized that the two dikes that remain in place, known as the Germano and Santarem dams, are “stable” and are being constantly monitored.

Workers returned to the facility in early January to undertake cleanup tasks, but the mine has not received authorization to resume its production operations.

The first spill occurred when two dikes containing residue and water ruptured, causing 62 million cubic meters (2.2 billion cubic feet) of waste material to cascade out in what is considered to be the world’s worst mining residue spill in recent decades.

The avalanche wiped out seven villages, contaminated 650 km (400 mi.) of the important Doce River basin and will cost some 20 billion reais ($4.8 billion) over decades to rectify.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2021 © All rights reserved