|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Zika-Linked Microcephaly Cases Rise 7% in Brazil

RIO DE JANEIRO – The number of Brazilian babies born with abnormally small heads – a condition known as microcephaly – as a result of prenatal infection with the Zika virus rose 7 percent last week, the Health Ministry said.

The number of babies born with microcephaly this year in an epidemic blamed on Zika jumped from 2,782 as of Dec. 22 to 2,975 in Tuesday’s report.

There were 147 reported cases of microcephaly during 2014, when the virus had not spread across the country.

The Health Ministry is investigating the deaths of 40 babies with suspected microcephaly in recent weeks to determine if it was caused by Zika, a virus transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito whose presence was detected for the first time this year in some Latin American countries.

According to the latest bulletin, based on figures as of Dec. 26, the number of cities with Zika-linked microcephaly cases jumped from 618 a year ago to 656 now.

Suspected cases of microcephaly have been registered in 20 of Brazil’s 27 states.

Although Zika was considered a less serious disease than dengue fever and Chikungunya, which are also transmitted by Aedes aegypti, the realization that it can cause malformations in fetuses and even death prompted Brazilian officials to declare a health emergency last month.

Microcephaly is an irreversible malformation of the brain usually associated with mental, visual and auditory problems.

Since there are no vaccines to prevent or treat any of the three viruses transmitted by the mosquito, the Health Ministry has focused on eliminating Aedes aegypti breeding areas.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2021 © All rights reserved