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  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Experts See Open Source Software as “Guarantee of Sovereignty”

MONTEVIDEO – This week’s 4th International Conference on Free Software and Open Source Code in Montevideo brings together developers and users who see open source as a “guarantee of sovereignty,” one of the organizers told EFE.

The stated aim of the conference is to strengthen the links between the educational, cultural and tech communities and explore the virtues of open source software, which users are free to copy, distribute or modify without incurring fees.

Uruguay’s state telecommunications company, Antel, and the public Universidad de la Republica organized the two-day symposium involving developers, educators and companies in the business of creating applications.

“We use open source software,” Antel President Andres Tolosa said. “Our focus is on communications and we provide support since our infrastructure enables a better development of open source software.”

Taking place alongside the conference is MoodleMoot Uruguay 2015, where researchers, educators, users, developers and administrators exchange ideas and experiences on technology and education with a focus on Moodle, one of the main online educational platforms based on open source software.

Virginia Rodes, Moodle’s coordinator in Uruguay, told EFE that the goal is to implement and use open source software in education in an open manner since that “is a guarantee of sovereignty.”

An additional goal, she said, is to make visible the use of open source software in education through alliances with Antel since the company provides a platform and connectivity “for the benefit of educators.”

Tolosa said that open source software has enjoyed robust growth in Uruguay over the past 10 years and that it continues increasing its share in the development market.

 

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