|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Rios Montt Defense Lawyer Slain in Guatemala

GUATEMALA CITY – One of the attorneys who represented former dictator Efrain Rios Montt at his trial for genocide was slain Wednesday in the Guatemalan capital.

Francisco Jose Palomo Tejeda, 63, was shot while driving his luxury car about 5 kilometers (3 miles) south of downtown Guatemala City, fire rescue spokesman Raul Hernandez told reporters.

The shooter was traveling on a motorcycle, according to witness accounts cited by the media.

Among the family members, colleagues and friends who gathered at the crime scene was Rios Montt’s daughter, Zury, who is seeking the presidency in September’s elections.

Palomo Tejeda, a high-powered lawyer who also defended former President Alfonso Portillo on corruption charges, spent 12 years as an alternate judge on Guatemala’s Constitutional Court.

The slain attorney was part of the defense team for Rios Montt’s trial two years ago for the deaths of 1,771 Ixil Indians between March 1982 and August 1983.

The octogenarian Rios Montt, whose time in power stood out as an especially bloody phase of Guatemala’s 1960-1996 civil war, was convicted and sentenced to 80 years in prison.

Within days, the Constitutional Court intervened to overturn the verdict and order a new trial, which is still pending.

Guatemala’s interior minister, Eunice Mendizabal, said Wednesday at the scene of the murder that she would name an “elite” team to investigate the crime and track down the perpetrators.

The 2013 trial of Rios Montt marked the first time any Guatemalan ruler was called to account for the massacres and atrocities of a conflict that claimed more than 200,000 lives, most of them Indian peasants slaughtered by the army and its paramilitary allies.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved