|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Business & Economy (Click here for more)

Wikileaks Publishes Documents Stolen in 2014 Cyberattack on Sony

WASHINGTON – Wikileaks, the website headed by Julian Assange, on Thursday published online all the documents and emails from Sony Pictures that last year were allegedly stolen by North Korean hackers.

The database published by Wikileaks consists of more than 30,000 documents, 173,000 emails and 2,200 email addresses from Sony Pictures Entertainment, the moviemaking affiliate of the Japanese tech giant.

In a communique, Assange, who founded Wikileaks, wrote in a statement that the information is “newsworthy and at the centre (sic) of a geopolitical conflict. It belongs in the public domain. WikiLeaks will ensure it stays there.”

He added that “This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation.”

Sony responded with a statement of its own in which it criticized the publication of the searchable database, which it said was private information obtained through a “criminal act.”

The hacking of Sony began last year and, according to the U.S. government, was the responsibility of North Korean cyber-pirates who were acting in reprisal for the release of a Sony Pictures film – “The Interview” – which makes fun of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

The documents made public by Wikileaks contain details of Sony’s relationships with politicians and its business strategies vis-a-vis its competition, among other things.

At the same time, it places at the disposal of Web users personal data collected on the multinational’s employees.

Until the publication of the searchable database by Wikileaks, the information had been made public in phases and the media had edited out sensitive data in their reporting of it.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved