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  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Brazil Recommends Two Crew Members Present in Cockpit During Flights

RIO DE JANEIRO – Brazil’s aviation regulator has recommended that airlines adopt measures ensuring at least two crew members are in the cockpit throughout flights.

The recommendation made Tuesday by the National Civil Aviation Agency (ANAC) requires at least two authorized persons, including a pilot, be present at all times during the course of a flight.

“This recommendation is in line with those of other regulatory authorities of civil aviation based on the information currently available on the accident of flight 4U9525 of Germanwings company that occurred on March 24,” ANAC said in a statement referring to the plane belonging to the Lufthansa subsidiary that crashed in the French Alps en route from Barcelona to Düsseldorf, Germany.

ANAC clarified that the recommendation is valid at least until the findings of investigations into that accident are revealed.

According to findings already revealed, the accident was caused by co-pilot Andreas Lübitz, who intentionally crashed the plane after the captain left the cockpit momentarily.

The tragedy took the lives of 150 people and has forced airline companies in different countries, especially in the European Union, to rethink aircraft safety measures.

The European Commission said on Monday it will decide whether to modify current regulations after the Germanwings investigation is concluded.

In the meantime, the European Aviation Safety Agency issued Friday a “provisional recommendation” to national aviation authorities and airlines to establish new security measures and ensure at least two authorized persons remain in the cockpit during flights.

 

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