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  HOME | Mexico

Families of Missing Students Claim Harassment by Mexican Authorities

MEXICO CITY – Families of the 43 students who went missing more than two months ago in southern Mexico have claimed the government is harassing organizations supporting them in their quest for justice.

At a press conference Thursday, the families blamed the authorities for this week’s attempted kidnapping and beating of a student who was also threatened for taking part in protests demanding that the missing students be returned alive.

“The government told us to stop (the protests) to avoid bloodshed,” said one of the family members, adding that the apparent threats did not scare them but in fact made them stronger.

According to the family member, the government is fearful of how the protests could evolve so it is trying to halt the demonstrations.

“The worst we could do is to shut up, and if we do so, corruption and harassment will keep on increasing,” she added.

The families announced that cultural activities will be scheduled from Dec. 23-27 in Ayotzinapa, where the missing students attended a teacher training college.

All the organizations willing to participate with any act, including a musical or theater work, are invited. Also those who cannot come to Ayotzinapa were urged to carry out peaceful and cultural activities in their regions.

The students went missing the night of Sept. 26 after an altercation with local police who detained them and then turned them over to a criminal gang.

According to testimony by gang members during police interrogation, the students were killed and their bodies burned.

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