|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Guatemala Introduces Coffee Plant Resistant to Rust Fungus

GUATEMALA CITY – Guatemala’s National Coffee Association (Anacafe) announced the existence of a new variety of coffee plant immune to roya, a fungus that causes coffee rust and which damaged crops on 70 percent of Guatemalan plantations in 2012 and 40 percent in 2013.

The plant, dubbed Anacafe-14, was presented Friday at the 25th National Coffee Congress, the organization said in a communique.

The new variety was created naturally in 1984 by a cross between Pacamara and Catimor plants near the village of El Tesoro, 206 kilometers (128 miles) from Guatemala City in Chiquimula province on the Honduran border.

The result of the natural hybridization produced “a sturdy plant” with “larger fruit,” Anacafe said.

The owner of a plot of land in Francisco Manchame village identified the coffee plant and began the process of selecting the best fruit to use as the seed, and in that way produced a new generation “with exceptional characteristics,” the organization said.

Following the fortuitous discovery and production of the plant, Anacafe said it detected the plot of land and began to supervise the crop “to technically confirm the characteristics” of the coffee plant, aware of its genetic potential.

The organization found, after six years of researching the soil, the climate and other factors, “valuable characteristics” in the variety, such as “resistance to roya and the drought,” along with “excellent vegetative vigor” and “high productivity.”

Roya, a rust fungus that spreads through coffee plantations, sometimes carried by the wind, first appeared in Guatemala in 1980, but a resurgence of the disease affected 70 percent of plantations in 2012 and 40 percent in 2013.

Guatemala is the seventh largest coffee exporter in the world and the commodity provides jobs for 1,100,000 Guatemalans, or 18 percent of the active working population, according to official figures.

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:



 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved