|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Spanish Researchers Narrow Search for Cervantes’s Remains

MADRID – Researchers searching for the remains of Miguel de Cervantes in the church of the Trinitarian convent in Madrid have found five places where he could be buried, including the church crypt, where they will begin looking since it is the area most easily accessible.

The study of the structure and subsoil of the church where Miguel de Cervantes was buried in 1616 was presented Monday to a crowded press conference at Cibeles Palace, at which geophysical radar mapping expert Luis Avial, historian Fernando de Prado and forensic scientist Francisco Etxeberria insisted once again that continuing the project is justifiable.

Besides the crypt “of a much bigger size than expected,” Etxeberria said, another four spots containing bones have been detected in the church, but the researchers plan to begin with the crypt since of all five points, that will be the easiest place to make an analysis.

Some 30 niches have been detected in the crypt, but in case Cervantes was not laid to rest in any of them, work will start on the next phase, which will include excavations in the nave of the church where double burials have been detected, a detail that Fernando de Prado told Efe is significant because the wife of the writer, Catalina de Salazar, was also buried in that church.

But another obstacle remains – the reluctance of the 13 cloistered nuns living in the Trinitarian convent to allow the exploration of their church, a conflict which, Etxeberria believes, can be resolved “through dialogue.”

Once the permits are obtained, a team of 10 technicians will access the crypt, perforate a wall and inspect the niches.

The project was started last April 28 using infrared radiation and geophysical radar mapping of the Trinitarian nuns’ convent church, located in the historic Letras neighborhood of Madrid, and came up with a 3D map presented Monday that identifies the five places where the creator of “Don Quixote” could have been buried.

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:



 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved