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  HOME | Mexico

Peña Nieto Names Former Spy as Mexico’s Anti-Crime Czar

MEXICO CITY – President Enrique Peña Nieto nominated attorney and former intelligence chief Monte Alejandro Rubido as the new chairman of Mexico’s National Security Commission.

If confirmed by the Senate, Rubido will succeed Manuel Mondragon, who asked to “withdraw from the operational realm” and focus on devising strategies for law enforcement, Government Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chang said.

Rubido, currently executive secretary of the National Public Safety System and the government’s spokesman on law-and-order issues, has “wide experience in this field,” according to Osorio Chang, Mexico’s No. 2 official.

The nominee’s resume includes stints as head of the Cisen intelligence agency and as deputy public safety secretary.

Mondragon displayed “professionalism and leadership” as chairman of the National Security Commission, where he oversaw the restructuring of the Federal Police and the implementation of anti-corruption measures, Osorio Chang said.

Peña Nieto’s administration created the commission to coordinate the activities of the Federal Police and other law enforcement agencies.

Mondragon, a surgeon who holds the rank of rear admiral in the navy medical corps, served in several federal posts prior to taking charge of the National Security Commission and is also a former police chief of Mexico City.

Peña Nieto took office in December 2012 vowing to bring a new approach toward curbing the violence, much of it drug-related, that claimed more than 100,000 lives during the administration of Felipe Calderon.

But official statistics released earlier this month show that more than 21,000 homicides were reported in the first 14 months of Peña Nieto’s government, just slightly fewer than the 21,206 murders documented in the initial 14 months of Calderon’s term.

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